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    Fred's 1930 Ford "Greyhound"


     When I was nine, dad bought a home made tractor that started out as a 1929 Model A Ford truck. My brother, Dean, started teaching me to drive on that tractor.  That tractor lasted a year before throwing a rod through the left side of the engine. Then Dean bought a '27 Model T Ford car that had a small dump bed mounted on back. We used it on the farm for nearly two years and I drove it often to do a variety of chores.
     In 1941, my dad bought a gray 1930 Model A Ford Tudor Sedan without wheels for $15 to make another home built tractor. He had built a tractor out of a Model T Ford about 20 years earlier. I remember sitting on it when I was four years old. But this 'new' Model A looked too good to cut up for a tractor, so my brother was permitted to buy wheels for it and drive it to school. He found a set of 21 inch wheels and tires for $25, a windshield for $5, and had a nice car.
     When Dean was drafted into the army in 1943, he and dad cut the body off the 1930 Ford and installed a pickup truck bed. The bed was mounted on a hinge that made it easy to dump. I had full use of that Ford for the next four years. I named it the "Greyhound" because it was gray and it was fast. When a part fell off, it didn't get put back on unless it wouldn't run without it.
     Every spring a few tons of manure had to be spread on the fields so we could find the barn. I would put a big heap of manure on the Greyhound, drive to the high end of the field and go down hill wide open. At 45 mph the bed was tripped. There was not much spreading left to do after that.  The Greyhound was used to go pick wild strawberries, haul kindling from the woods, fish in nearby streams and go to the swimming hole for a bath. Sometimes I just ripped around for the fun of it.  I was 16 in the fall of '46. Naturally, I 'needed' a car to drive on the highway. I had to pay $175 for a '29 Model A Ford 4-door sedan. The war had caused a shortage of used cars, and the prices went sky high for anything that would run. My '29 had the usual 3 speeds forward but only two throttle settings... stop and wide open. During the year and a half that I drove the Ford, three engines were in it… twice.  The Greyhound was soon used up for spare parts.  I didn't know any better!
     In the meantime, dad bought a Farmall A tractor and we didn't need the Greyhound anymore. Besides, I needed parts to keep the '29 running. When I sold the '29 Sedan, it had the head lights, steering column and several other parts from the Greyhound. Just three years ago I found the two head lights from my '29 Ford in the rafters of the barn. Nope… not for sale!
     I bought a '34 Chevrolet during the summer of 1948 to get a 'faster' car. I could go 4 mph faster.   
In the fall of '48, I joined the Air Force. As soon as basic training was over I discovered I could have a car at the Air Base. It took me two weeks to find another 1930 Model A Ford Tudor Sedan.
     But things change. A Model A Ford was just too slow in 1950. I bought a 1942 Buick and could go almost twice as fast. I forget how many Buicks I had, but I remember owning 6 Model A Ford cars, two trucks, and 3 home made Model A tractors.
     And one of those Model A Fords was very special. I called it the
"Greyhound".

                Fred Hauck, Model A Ford Owner and member of the Lakeshore Model A Ford Club

This workhorse of a Ford was only 14 years old at the time. It was used to haul tons of stone, manure, dirt, firewood… anything that had to be moved. That's Ernest and Gretchen standing, and me at the wheel. Gretchen was holding the cat in front of her face

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